Skip to main content

Natural Gas: Safety

Question for Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government

UIN 156392, tabled on 22 February 2021

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing targeted enforcement measures for the compulsory inclusion of a Unique Property Reference Number for (a) gas safety certificates and (b) mortgage lenders; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect of introducing such measures on the ability of rogue landlords to be profiled.

Answered on

25 February 2021

Unique Property Reference Numbers (UPRNs) hold significant value in allowing different data-sets associated with buildings to be linked together. My Department will seek to utilise this where possible, enabling all data users to have a well-rounded view on information that relates to each building

However, local authorities already have a range of tools available to them to take the most appropriate enforcement action including placing landlords on to the Database of Rogue Landlords and Property Agents where the landlord meets the criteria. Where a landlord has received a Banning order the local authority must place them on the database, where the landlord has received a conviction for a banning order offence or 2 or more civil penalties for housing related offences then the local authority has discretion to make an entry

For properties that require an annual gas safety check (under regulation 36 of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations), there is already a requirement to include details of the property address on the associated records. There are no plans to extend the requirements to include the UPRN on the safety check record and there has been no assessment of the potential merits of introducing targeted enforcement measures for the compulsory inclusion of a UPRN for gas safety certificates. At this time, we are not making an assessment of a connection between UPRNs and mortgages.

Named day
Named day questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.