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Prison Sentences

Question for Ministry of Justice

UIN HL10576, tabled on 23 November 2020

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the breakdown of the tariff-expired unreleased life prisoner population by (1) original tariff length, and (2) time over tariff.

Answered on

7 December 2020

The tariff-expired unreleased lifer prisoner population, broken down by original tariff length and time over tariff as of 30 September 2020, is shown in the following table:

Original Tariff Length

Time over tariff

Less than or equal to 10 years

Greater than 10 years to less than or equal to 20 years

More than 20 years

Total

Less than 1 year

46

135

6

187

From 1 year to less than 2 years

43

96

5

144

From 2 years to less than 3 years

25

68

8

101

From 3 years to less than 4 years

27

50

2

79

From 4 years to less than 5 years

22

51

3

76

From 5 years to less than 6 years

29

37

4

70

From 6 years to less than 7 years

37

45

3

85

From 7 years to less than 8 years

31

39

1

71

From 8 years to less than 9 years

41

33

2

76

From 9 years to less than 10 years

62

31

2

95

From 10 years to less than 11 years

47

27

3

77

From 11 years to less than 12 years

64

13

3

80

From 12 years to less than 13 years

54

14

1

69

From 13 years to less than 14 years

54

14

0

68

From 14 years to less than 15 years

48

19

2

69

From 15 years to less than 16 years

47

13

1

61

From 16 years to less than 17 years

25

9

0

34

From 17 years to less than 18 years

24

18

0

42

From 18 years to less than 19 years

21

10

0

31

From 19 years to less than 20 years

14

7

0

21

20 years or more

80

55

3

138

Total

841

784

49

1,674

These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.

It may be useful to note that statistics on the indeterminate population in prisons are routinely published as part of the Offender Management Statistics Quarterly on Gov.uk - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly .

I would like to be clear that our primary responsibility is to protect the public. We do not want to keep indeterminate sentenced prisoners in custody any longer than is necessary, but we have a duty to ensure that they are progressed in a safe manner. It remains the case that prisoners serving life and other indeterminate sentences will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.