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Prisoners: Repatriation

Question for Ministry of Justice

UIN 55982, tabled on 2 December 2016

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many foreign national offenders have been returned to prison in their own country under each of the compulsory prisoner transfer agreements the UK has with (a) Jamaica, (b) Libya, (c) Rwanda, (d) Albania, (e) Nigeria and (f) any other country.

Answered on

3 February 2017

We are committed to increasing the number of Foreign National Offenders removed from the United Kingdom. Since 2010, over 33,000 foreign national offenders have been removed; with 5,810 removed from prisons, immigration removal centres and the community in 2015/16.

The Early Removal Scheme is the principal method for removing foreign national offenders early from prison. In 2015/16, 2071 foreign national offenders were removed under this scheme.

The compulsory transfer of prisoners outside the European Union is less straightforward and may be affected by issues such as prison conditions or the prevailing security situation in a country. Turkey has only recently implemented a compulsory transfer arrangements. Eligible Turkish nationals are currently being identified for transfer.

The table below shows the number of prisoners transferred to prisons in their own countries under compulsory prisoner transfer arrangements (other than the EU Prisoner Transfer Framework Decision). The United Kingdom does not have a prisoner transfer agreement with Jamaica.

Transfer of prisoners from England and Wales to countries under compulsory prisoner transfer agreements (not including Member States of the European Union).

Country

No Transferred

Albania

17

Georgia

--

Libya

--

Moldova

--

Montenegro

--

Nigeria

1

Norway

--

Russia

--

Rwanda

--

Serbia

--

San Marino

--

Somaliland

--

Switzerland

--

Turkey*

--

--

Total

18

*Entered into force September 2016

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