Skip to main content

Alcoholic Drinks and Drugs: Rehabilitation

Question for Department of Health

UIN 205119, tabled on 10 July 2014

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much each local authority with public health responsibilities in England spent on (a) drug treatment, (b) alcohol treatment and (c) in total in each of the last three financial years; and how much each body is expected to spend in each of the next two years.

Answered on

15 July 2014

A breakdown of drug treatment funding for 2012-13, including allocations to local areas has been placed in the Library and can be found at the Public Health England alcohol and drugs website:

www.nta.nhs.uk/news-2012-ptb.aspx

In 2012-13, alcohol services were funded from primary care trusts mainstream budgets. As there were no central reporting requirements, there is no equivalent alcohol funding figure.

As part of conditions attached to the Public Health Grant, the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) requires local authorities to report projected and actual spend on an annual basis. There are categories for spending on adult drug treatment, adult alcohol treatment and young people's substance misuse interventions.

Local authority spending forecasts against these categories in 2013-14 have been published by the DCLG. The figures are available in the table ‘Revenue account (RA) budget 2013 to 2014', which has been placed in the library and is also available on the gov.uk website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2013-to-2014-individual-local-authority-data

However, not all local authorities submitted their forecasts, so these figures are incomplete. DCLG will publish figures on actual spend later this year.

Equivalent figures for projected and actual spend for 2014-15 and subsequent years are not yet available.

Answered by

Department of Health and Social Care
Named day
Named day questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.